Maintenance Tips: AC, Car Battery and More

Friday, October 4, 2013


We have six great tips on how to maintain your air conditioner, battery and more. Take a look.
1. Run your AC in winter
To keep your car’s air-conditioning system fit for the next warm season, run it a few times throughout the winter. This will prevent moving parts in the compressor from seizing. Also, circulating the refrigerant will help keep the seals soft and pliant.
2. Maintain your car’s battery
Maybe the manufacturer says your battery is maintenancefree, but don’t you believe it! Check your battery regularly to extend its life and avoid the hassle of being stranded with a dead battery.
  • Begin with the simple: keeping your battery clean. A dirty case can actually cause current to drain. Wipe with a damp rag. Use a mild detergent if necessary.
  • Next, clean the battery posts or terminals. Loosen and remove the negative cable (black or minus sign) first, then the red positive cable. Use a brass wire battery brush dipped in a paste made from a few tablespoons of baking soda and a little water.
  • Inspect the battery case for damage, such as cracks or bulges — signs that a battery needs to be replaced.
  • Reinstall the cables, positive first, and coat the terminals and clamps with a thin coating of grease to prevent new corrosion.
3. Some batteries need water
If your battery has vent caps, remove them to check the level of the electrolyte. It should rise 1/2 inch (13 mm) above the battery’s top plates. If it doesn’t, use distilled water to raise the level to 1/4 or 3/8 inch (6 or 10 mm) below the bottom of the vent cap. Don’t use tap water, as it may contain minerals that can damage your battery. Mechanics should check your battery as a part of your regularly scheduled maintenance, but they often skip the procedure. Be sure to ask to have it done.
4. Be kind to your battery
If you inadvertently leave your lights on and drain your battery, take the following precautions to prevent damage to the battery and the starter when jump-starting your car:
  • Don’t risk causing the battery to explode. With both cars off, connect a positive cable end to the positive battery terminal of the dead battery.
  • Connect the other positive cable end to the positive terminal of the source battery.
  • Connect a negative cable end to the negative terminal of the source battery.
  • Attach the remaining negative cable to unpainted metal on the car engine (as far from the dead battery as possible).
  • Wait a few minutes and try to start the disabled car. If it doesn’t start, start the source car and then try starting the dead one again.
  • When the car starts, be careful to disconnect the cables in the reverse order.
  • If the car still doesn’t start, don’t keep trying to charge it or you are liable to damage the starter. Bring the battery to an automotive shop to see if it can be recharged.
  • Even if you’re successful, ensure a full recharge by hooking up the battery to a charger overnight or by driving the car for 5 or 10 miles (8 to 16 km).
5. Seal a leaky radiator
Save the high expense of a new radiator by trying to seal a leak with a radiator sealer, such as Alumaseal from Gold Eagle Co. Available in powder or liquid form, the product circulates in the radiator until it gets to the hole, where it sets up and fills the hole upon contact with the air. Alumaseal may be used to stop heater core leaks as well.
6. Dilute your coolant
Your cooling system needs both coolant-antifreeze and water, so don’t pour undiluted coolant into your cooling system. Dilute it with water to the commonly recommended 50-50 ratio. Similarly, don’t use straight water in your system either.The coolant protects against corrosion and freezing.The water ensures good heat transfer from the coolant to the radiator.

Maintenance Tips: Six keys to great tires

Friday, September 27, 2013

Your tires are one of the most important parts of your vehicle. Keeping them in good shape is essential. Take a look at these six tips on tire maintenance.

1. Keep the caps on
You step out into driveway ready to start your morning commute only to discover a flat tire. How in the heck did that happen overnight? If the tire valve is missing its cap, the culprit might be a leaky valve. Those little caps keep out dirt and moisture that can cause leaks, so be sure to keep caps on all your tire valves. Another tip: When you replace tires, remind the tire shop that you expect new valves with the tires.
2. Maintain proper inflation
Under-inflated tires are a tire salesman’s best friend. They create excessive heat and stress that can lead to tire failure. If you want to get every last mile out of your tires, get yourself a tire pressure gauge and use it at least once a month (more in hot weather) to keep your tires inflated to the recommendation in the vehicle’s owner’s manual. Check tires when they are cold (driven for less than one mile) for an accurate reading.
3. Beware the wet thumb
If you top off your tires at a service station, check to see if there’s moisture coming from the air pump. Simply depress the pin inside the inflator valve with your thumbnail. If your thumb gets wet, advise the station manager that his tanks need to be drained and go to a different station. Moisture, trapped inside a tire, can cause pressure variations and corrode rims.
4. Check for uneven wear
Check tires for uneven wear. If you’ve maintained tire inflation properly, uneven wear may indicate the need for a wheel realignment. It can also mean improperly operating brakes or shocks, a bent wheel, internal tire damage, or worn bushings.
5 Check tread for safety
Most states require tires to be replaced when they have worn down to 1/16-inch (1.5 mm) of remaining tire depth. Tires sold in North America are required to have “wear bars” molded into them to make it easy to see when tire replacement is legally required. However, if you’ll be driving in the rain, you should change your tires when there is 1/8-inch (3 mm) of tread left. Otherwise, water may not escape from under your tires fast enough and you risk hydroplaning — a dangerous situation in which your car loses traction and literally floats on the water. Stick an American quarter between the treads in several places. If part of Washington’s head is always covered, you have enough tread to drive in the rain. If you drive in snow, you’ll need at least 3/16-inch (5 mm) of tread to get adequate traction. Stick an American penny between the treads. If the top of the Lincoln Memorial is always covered, you’re ready for winter driving.
6. Rotate your tires
Rotating your tires helps to distribute tire wear evenly and ensures that you’ll get the maximum road life out of them. The first rotation is especially important.Your owner’s manual should specify both rotation period and pattern. If not, rotate your tires every 6,000 to 7,500 miles (9,700 to 12,000 km) — your tire dealer should know the correct pattern of tire rotation.

Five Tips To Make Sure Your Exterior Shines

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Would you like to make sure your vehicle catches the public's eye? Check out these five tips to help your exterior remain immaculate.

1. Protect car paint from the sun
Paint does more than make your vehicle look great. It’s also the first line of defense against rusted body panels. Of course, the best way to protect the paint is to park the car in a garage. If that is not possible, park in the shade or purchase a car cover. The sun’s ultraviolet rays break down paint and cause it to fade. Some car covers protect your car from more than sun, moisture, bird droppings, and dust — they also have a thin layer of cushioning that will guard against light impact, such as from a tipped bicycle or small falling tree branch.
2. Touch up nicks sooner rather than later
Touch-up paint won’t adhere well to rust. So be sure to keep some matching touch-up paint on hand so you can touch up any minor nicks, often found around door edges, before rust has a chance to form.
3. Fill with washer fluid only
Don’t add water to the windshield washer reservoir. It won’t clean as well as washer fluid, and it may freeze in cold weather and damage the system. Don’t try to run your windshield washer system once you suspect there’s no more fluid in the tank, or you may damage the washer fluid pump.
4. Fix small windshield chips
Got a rock chip, crack, or ding in your windshield? Bring your car to a windshield repair shop. For far less cost than replacing the windshield, they can fix chips and cracks, even quite long ones. The repairs not only keep the chips and cracks from spreading and restore structural integrity, they also improve clarity.
5. Tape saves light covers
A cracked taillight or turn-signal cover, if left alone, may allow your light compartment to fill with water and cause some real damage. A good short-term fix is to tape over the crack. Use the red or orange tape that’s made for this purpose.You can purchase it at many automotive parts stores.

Save big on the 2013 Toyota Prius Two

Friday, August 23, 2013


We have great savings for you! You can lease a 2013 Toyota Prius for $179 per a month. That's not all! You can also purchase this vehicle for zero percent APR for up to 60 months. At Newark Toyota World, we offer savings galore!

Check out the 2013 Toyota Sienna at Newark Toyota World

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

This is the country's most popular minivan! The 2013 Toyota Sienna provides you with an incredible driving experience. This minivan offers great features and safety. Click here to learn more about the Sienna.

Drive away in the Toyota Prius today at Newark Toyota World

Tuesday, July 30, 2013


The 2013 Toyota Prius offers 44 miles per a gallon. This car features great fuel efficiency, technology and an experience that stands out. The Prius is a smart choice. Click here to learn more about the Prius.

Check out the 2013 Land Cruiser at Newark Toyota World

Tuesday, July 23, 2013


The 2013 Toyota Land Cruiser is here. Picture yourself behind the wheel of this incredible vehicle. This SUV offers great features, style, safety and comfort. We invite you to visit us today and enjoy a test drive. Click here to learn more about the Land Cruiser.
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